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Pet-Friendly Travel: Top 6 Moving Day Tips for Pets

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It’s time for you and your pet to relocate! You’ve packed everything and are waiting for the movers to come. You’ve completed your pre-moving-day pet checklist, which includes new pet ID tags, a pet travel carrier, and a reservation at a pet-friendly hotel and other necessities of your pet as listed in Petstock. Here are the top six moving day recommendations for pets:

1. Assure that the pet is comfortable and secured

This is equally important while moving out of your old home and into your new one. With all of the commotion, open doors, and possible turmoil that a physical move entails, it’s critical to ensure that your pet is safe, happy, and secure.

Place your pet in a quiet and secure location. You should choose an area that they are acquainted with and feel at ease in. This may be their pet cage (located in an inconspicuous location) or a restroom you must assure that they are unable to escape and depart at any point during the transfer. If you confine your pet to a room, make sure to post a notice on the door stating that others are not permitted to enter.

2. Maintain a close check on them at all times

If your dogs are staying with you on moving day, keep an eye on them throughout the day. Maintain their regular feeding, walking, toilet breaks, and (most importantly) loving routines.

3. Familiar environments in a new home

While introducing your dog, cat, or another furry family member, one of the most effective ways to help them feel more at peace in their new home is to have their items in it. Whether it’s their favourite chair, dog bed, throw rug, toys, or all of the above, encircle your pet with familiar stuff. Prepare all of the stuff your pet will require from the moment you move into your new home.

4. Always keep your pets on a leash

Many heartbreaking experiences of dogs leaving when they relocate to a new home have been shared with us. Even dogs who are outstanding under voice control might get quickly sidetracked in a new neighbourhood and setting, so pet parents should be mindful of this. When you’re not at home, please keep your pet on a leash or in a gated yard, at least until they’ve shown to you that they’re at peace in their new surroundings.

5. It’s always preferable to be safe rather than regretful

You may not want to think about it, but keep a recent photo of your pet on your phone in case he or she becomes separated from you. In addition to their ID tag and microchip, a picture of your pet will aid in his or her safe return home.

Also, remember to have a calm demeanour. So please take a few deep breaths since our dogs can sense our emotions. Moving with your pet is a new adventure and a fresh start; grasp this sweetest opportunity and feel the bliss of being with your pet.

6. Pay a visit to the veterinarian

Gather all of your current veterinarian’s medical records and prescription medications. Take advantage of this chance to ensure that your immunizations and any medicines are current.

If you know your pet is nervous about travelling, talk to your veterinarian about utilizing anti-anxiety or car sickness medicine.

Make a note of the identity, location, and contact information of a new veterinarian in the region. In the event of an emergency, having the contact information on hand may be quite beneficial. You can also seek advice from your existing veterinarian.

Suppose you’re relocating to a new state or nation. In that case, it’s also a good idea to check with a local veterinarian or government body to see if there are any rules or regulations you must follow.

Conclusion 

Moving is stressful and difficult, especially when dogs are involved. Most pets are creatures of habit, and they can develop strong attachments to their home. Changing one’s accustomed surroundings may be highly disorienting and annoying. Following the six suggestions above can help you and your pet feel less stressed and guarantee that your pet is safe and comfortable before, after, and on moving day.

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5 Common Health Issues That Cat Owners Need to Take Care of

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As a cat owner, you should know the signs and symptoms of common illnesses so that you can get your companion medical help as soon as possible. You should know about the diseases and other medical disorders that cats are prone to.

As a cat parent, it is critical to identify the problems of common diseases in cats so that you may seek medical assistance for your feline companion as soon as possible. Sometimes the reason for illness may also be the food your cat is consuming. So it is advisable to feed your cat with standard food. You can also order good-quality cat food online. Know about diseases and other medical conditions that commonly affect cats.

1. Scratching

It may appear like your cat is clawing your couch and curtains to upset you, but they do so to relieve stress, play, and even get rid of frayed claws. The good news is that scratching is simple to avoid. So you do not have to put up with dingy furniture or prevent your cat from acting naturally.

Trimming your cat’s claws may appear daunting at first, but it is a lot easier than you might expect. Claw caps in various colors will transform your cat into a fashion plate when these small vinyl sleeves go over the kitty’s claws to protect them from scratching and damage.

2. Tapeworm

The cat tapeworm is a parasite transmitted to dogs, cats, and humans by ingesting infected fleas. This parasite is prevalent in cats, although it only causes illness in pets and humans on rare occasions. The tapeworm is disseminated when a cat or person swallows an infected flea.

When cats groom themselves, they may swallow fleas. It is possible to avoid infection by treating pets with fleas. Because you must swallow a flea to become infected, the risk of contracting this tapeworm is relatively low. The majority of instances affect young children.

3. Diabetes

Diabetes is a complicated condition in cats caused by a shortage of the hormone insulin or insufficient insulin response. After a cat eats, her digestive system breaks down the food into several components, including glucose, which insulin transports into her cells.

When a cat’s body does not create enough insulin or use it properly, her blood sugar levels rise. Hyperglycemia is the result, and if left untreated, it can cause a cat’s health to deteriorate significantly. You should know that diabetes is a curable disease, and many diabetic cats can live happy healthy lives. Some people may even experience remission!

4. Heartworm

Infected mosquitoes can spread heartworm disease. This disease is becoming better recognized as the underlying cause of health problems in domestic cats. Cats are an unusual heartworm host. Cats are less likely to contract the condition.

5. Giardia

Giardia is a parasite found on surfaces, water, food, and soil that an infected person or animal excrement has polluted. Giardia is spread by swallowing tiny excrement containing the parasite after contact with an infected person or animal and drinking water or eating food contaminated with dung from infected people or animals. Cats pose a low risk of Giardia infection. The Giardia that gets people sick is usually not the same as the Giardia that infects cats.

Final thoughts

Cats are known for being low-maintenance pets, making them ideal for folks who do not have the time to care for a pet. Allowing a cat to suffer from illness is a form of animal cruelty. This is due to your cat’s persistent discomfort.

Cats have a more graceful aging process than dogs, but they also get older. They will eventually be unable to jump to the top of the refrigerator. Their appetites will be dwindling as they grow older. Cats who dwell indoors live far longer than cats who live outside. Indoor-only cats live around 2.5 times longer than outdoor cats or indoor/outdoor cats, according to a Purdue University study from a few years ago.

A thorough examination is necessary for diagnosing the disorders in cats, which may not be as visible as those in dogs due to cats’ propensity for hiding pain. Once you have identified the issues, devise a treatment strategy that may include extractions to put a stop to your cat’s misery.

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Heading Back to the Office? How to Ask Management to Bring Your Dog with You

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Dogs make people smile, they radiate a positive energy, and they make every moment more enjoyable. This is a great reason to wear your cute and comfortable dog socks to work every day — but what about to bring your cute and cuddly dog itself into work with you every day?

Boasting many wellness and productivity benefits, allowing employees to bring their pets into work with them has become an increasingly popular decision. Before you start packing your dog up for the office, though, it’s important to honestly review whether or not your pet is right for the office environment, whether your office environment is right for pets, and how to take it all from “right” to “perfect”.

Questions to ask yourself

Is your workplace appropriate for pets? Maybe your dog is sensitive to noises and barks every time the elevator dings, maybe your big dog is actually a scardey-cat and cowers in fear because of high public or client traffic, or maybe your dog isn’t suited to the sterile or focused environment. An unsuitable or unstable environment will guarantee a dog who’s going to react loudly, fearfully, or in a distracting manner, which is bad for everyone — including your dog.

Will you be able to do your work? Maybe your fur baby is uncomfortable, or maybe she’s just too darn cute — either way, there’s a good chance that you can’t take your eyes off of her. Don’t feel bad if you need your own space to work with no distraction, no matter how good of a distraction your dog may be.Will your dog adjust? Maybe your dog is super territorial, maybe she would prefer to sleep on the couch at home all day long rather than be stressed in the middle of the office’s energy, or maybe she doesn’t adapt well to change and unpredictability. There will be issues to work through with your pet to get them comfortable with being in the office just like you’ve done at home — but there will be some issues that your dog just won’t be able to adjust to here.

The approach to approaching 

  1. Talk to your co-workers

Whether it be due to allergies, fears, or behavioral and training concerns, your coworkers may have reservations about you bringing your dog into the workplace, and you’ll have to be sensitive to your coworkers’ reservations and consider if there may be a way to resolve their concerns. Also important is finding out how many employees may be equally interested in bringing their dogs to work with them — if you can display that many of your coworkers are in the same boat and want to bring their pets into work with them, your boss and any coworkers with reservations may be more likely to consider the idea.

  1. Hande dog-proofing the office

Your boss is already responsible for you and your coworkers, daily tasks, overall operations, and much more — and they don’t want to be responsible for your dogs, too. Make sure that you are carrying the weight of this project by preparing and dog-proofing your office so that they don’t have to think about it. Find areas outdoors suitable for walking dogs and letting them relieve themselves, identify all areas in the office that should be dog-free, and note areas where you may need to add features to accommodate pets such as animal waste disposal bins.

  1. Think it through (and show your work!)

Show management that you’ve thought this through and have it covered by establishing rules like: only home-trained pets allowed, no sick pets allowed, and strict scheduling for Pet Days. If you’re willing to establish an employee-led committee that can create and implement these policies and follow up on any complaints, management is much more likely to accept your idea with enthusiasm.

  1. Ask for a trial period

Consider asking to allow dogs in the office for a short trial period to demonstrate that pets in the workplace can have a significantly positive impact on your company, and to see how your rules and preparations work in practice. It’s important to make sure that everyone has a fair chance to make adjustments and become comfortable, but you will need to draw the line somewhere if it isn’t working out.

  1. Get it in writing

For your coworkers’, your company’s, and your own legal and physical safety, implementing mandatory liability forms and having a formal policy in place that establishes clear responsibility for any damage or injury that occurs as a result of their pet, for all participants, is always a good idea.

Etiquette to keep in mind

Help your dog adjust properly and work through issues. Before bringing your dog into the office, consider finding items like cute dog toys meant especially for the office and a bed that will make her feel comfortable and mark her spot here. Along with this, consider letting your dog smell and sleep with these items for a while before you take them to the office. Bringing your dog into the office in the morning (or the most low-energy time of day), and then taking her back home at lunch, is also a good way to start this endeavor off on the right foot.

Keep your dog clean and healthy Always remember that your dog’s ability to adjust, hang around peacefully, and remain happy will rely on them being healthy. This means plenty of quality exercise and playtime, keeping a healthy diet, and making regular trips to the vet. When you’re at the vet, it’s essential that you keep your dog up to date on all vaccinations and flea and tick treatments as well. Washing your dog, their bed, and their toys frequently, as well as addressing any outstanding hygiene issues as quickly as possible, will only serve to help you in this area.

Inform potential hires By letting candidates know (or incorporating it into your planning so that whoever is in the position to do so will let them know) about your pet policies well in advance of their time of hiring, you can be proactive in preventing future issues between people and pet officemates.

Heading back to the pawfice

By asking yourself the right questions, identifying concerns and accompanying solutions, taking over certain responsibilities, and staying vigilant when it comes to your pet owner etiquette — getting your dog into the office and making sure they don’t overstay their welcome can be as easy as asking!

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How Expensive Is It To Own A Racehorse?

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For many, the dream of owning a racehorse is something that millions aspire to achieve. However, in reality, the dream isn’t as possible as many would like to believe.

Horse ownership for racing fans is a pipedream, but it is still only the wealthiest of people that can afford the luxury.

Below, we will go through the costs of owning a racehorse and examine whether there are any other options available to those that want to own a horse but don’t have the financial wealth required.

How Much Does It Cost?

Buying a racehorse ultimately depends on what you’re trying to get out of the ownership. If you’re looking to get returns by winning some of the biggest races, then you will need to pay an awful lot more and also pay extra for leading trainers.

Typically, flat horses are more expensive than National Hunt horses. Some of the most prestigious flat races see three-year-olds compete, while the biggest National Hunt race in the United Kingdom is the Grand National, which sees older horses race over four miles.

Figures found by the British Horse Racing Authority found that the average cost of owning a flat horse is £23,000, while owning a similar calibre of jumps horse would cost £17,000. Obviously, these figures could also differ depending on the trainer that you opt for, and whether there are any injury complications, which could see both figures rise significantly.

Added on to this is the price that you will actually pay to buy the racehorse. As we mentioned previously, the price of the horse could differ depending on the breed. However, the research found that the average price for a racehorse is £12,000.

Most Expensive Racehorse

Some of the most talented horses in training have commanded huge fees, and the most expensive is Fusaichi Pegasus. The Japanese horse was brought for just over £3 million, but rewarded connections for the purchase by winning some of the most illustrious races in the United States.

His biggest victories came in 2000, as he won the Kentucky Derby, Wood Memorial Stakes and San Felipe Stakes, that happens in Santa Anita Park (you can find Santa Anita Park Racing Picks, Tips & Predictions here).

He was then sold to stud at Coolmore Stud for a remarkable £35 million, which eclipsed the previous record of £24 million that was paid for Shareef Dancer. Fusaichi Pegasus has produced a number of Grade 1 winners since being stood for stud, which includes Roman Ruler, Haradasun and Bandini.

Other Types of Horse Ownership

Due to the financial cost of owning a racehorse outright, one of the easiest and most affordable ways to get involved in the sport is through syndicates. Syndicates have been on the rise for a number of years now, as it offers regular people a chance to get involved in the sport that they love. To get involved, potential owners can pay a price to own a share of the horse.

Obviously, this means reduced returns after winning races, but syndicate owners get all the benefits that come with owning a racehorse, which includes regular stable visits and owner badges to watch the horse in action.

Syndicate payments work slightly differently, as potential owners will pay for their share, whether it be 5% or 10% upfront, before then paying a monthly training fee for the horse.

Not only is this an exciting way to be part of owning a racehorse, but you can also get involved in ownership with family or friends, which means that you can enjoy social days out watching your horse and hoping that it crosses the line first.

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